Who Am Me?

I generally miss late night television, craving sleep over laughs, but had the TV on mute last night while engrossed in a novel. I glanced up as The Late Show’s Stephen Colbert launched into the facilitation of his own MBTI with Master Practitioner, Julie Raynor Gross. It was hilarious with captioning, even more so watching it again with sound. If you enjoy psychometrics and personality type, this is a must-see.

New piece of the pie

240419_10150176805338101_8019007_o (1)A while back I hinted at a new opportunity that would be headed my way. After months of discussions and negotiations I am very pleased to announce that I am the new vice president of National Student Exchange (NSE). The NSE appointment is half time allowing a continuation of current responsibilities with my university.
NSE is a not-for profit education consortium that provides exchange and study away opportunities to students enrolled at its 170 member colleges and universities in the United States, Canada, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Established in 1968, NSE has provided exchange opportunities to more than 110,000 students. I helped to initiate the program on our campus in 1997 and have been the NSE Coordinator for 18 years. In this position, I have served on NSE’s governing board, mentored new coordinators, and have been a regular presenter on assessment and best practices at NSE’s annual placement conference.
Of course, an opportunity like this could not happen without partnership and support from my university. I am very grateful to my colleagues and supervisors who have helped me navigate this new leadership adventure. I am certain we will find many rewards.

 

Pattern Recognition

And then there was that day I was absorbed in readings from venture writers and entrepreneurs.
I was reminded of comments by colleagues returning from the spring conferences that seem to cater to “older white men” or specialized groups, without feeling inclusive. I was reminded of times that I have leaned in and been told, “wait,” “NO,” or “it’s the way you say things.”
As I ponder the events of a woman facing potential discrimination in the tech industry, it feels close to home for any of the number of protected or marginalized populations we can belong to on our campuses.
“What is undeniable, however, is that [venture capital] is absurdly male-dominated and changing very, very slowly. That sucks and needs to change.” ~Jason Calacanis
What if you reframe that statement…
What is undeniable, however, is that [senior student affairs leadership] is absurdly [insert your choice of privilege]-dominated and changing very, very slowly.
That still sucks and needs to change.
As Adam Quinton notes, we miss great opportunities by following the same pattern recognition every time someone is allowed to ascend to the top leadership. Too much pattern and everything looks the same.