Sunday Funday?

It’s the last day of spring break for my children and the end of a 3-day weekend for the adults in our family. We spent time relaxing this year, enjoying our favorite hobbies – reading, soccer, sleeping, video games, or binge watching TV shows. Like clockwork, today welcomed the wrath of the middle-schooler, distraught about returning to school. He’s a good student, but the idea of the structure and routine of the school day is a crush to his spirit. It’s those Sunday night blues.
I try to focus on the good of every day and to escape that “living for the weekend” mentality, but everyone needs a little help to get past it. Yolanda Wikiel offers great tips for making your Sunday easier to tolerate.
Do Sunday on Saturday: Get homework, laundry, blog writing (!), and other chores out of the way first thing on Saturday. Leave free relaxation time for Sunday, particularly Sunday evening.
Be a Forward Thinker: Plan ahead before leaving work or school on Friday so you can finish that to-do list and clear your mind.
Be Social: Get out of the house, enjoy coffee with friends, visit your favorite bookstore, or volunteer in the community on your Sunday.
Sunday Night 2.0: Switch up that idea that reclining on the couch is the best end to your weekend. Take a walk, begin a new book, or plan a brief outing to keep your mind busy.
I may have threatened my son with homeschooling if he didn’t snap out of his funk, but remember that every day of your week should be cause for celebration.
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Make Shift Happen

When I first began a career in student affairs, my director was a good and fair person, always supporting a life in balance. Work late for a program? Take a few hours of personal time the next day. Spend a weekend away at a conference? Be sure to take a personal day to catch up on things at home. As a supervisor, I have attempted to mirror this courtesy, believing that people, and family and lives, are more important than a 60-hour workweek. There will always be work to done, reports to write, and programs to plan.
The theme of work-life balance remains a popular topic among colleagues as we seek an adequate distribution. Too many friends make 10-12 hour work days a habit while answering the duty phone each weekend. While we advise students to choose a few extracurricular activities on which to focus, we disregard this advice and drive ourselves to exhaustion.
Clare Cady fired off a discussion on the topic, inviting us to shift our thinking.

I am of the school that work-life balance does not exist. There is life. Part of life for many of us includes work, hopefully in a field where we are happy and satisfied. But life is not about work — it is about living.

Neutral zone infraction

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In U.S. football, when the two teams are lined up before a play, a penalty is called if a defender improperly enters the neutral zone prior to the start of play. This can cause an offensive player to jump or false start before the play. The neutral zone is defined as the length of the football, 11 inches, from end to end. The only player allowed in the neutral zone is the offensive player snapping the ball. This penalty is called a neutral zone infraction.
For geeks like me, neutral zones are the buffers and borders of spacefaring civilizations requiring treaties and agreements; think Klingons and Romulans. Bigger than a football, these un-owned, unnamed, impartial spaces are meant to keep the peace.
We keep neutral zones around us, these somewhat safe places, to protect ourselves. Maybe we need to poke a few holes in them instead, make a few infractions. Let the air in. Or let it out.

Change trains.

A morning conversation with a colleague centered on change. Life changes, work changes; changes comprise our life. How we react to these fluctuations is what allows us to make it through the day.
What happens when change does not come fast enough? On more occasions than I would like to admit, I have found myself lamenting the good fortune of others. “That should have been MY job.” “I was due for that raise.”
This “Why not me?” attitude is a heavy, messy piece of luggage to carry around. If these things did not happen for me, they were not mine to own. It’s time to shrug them off and take the next train.
Nothing ever is. Everything is becoming. ~Heraclitus
If a train doesn’t stop at your station, then it’s not your train. ~Marianne Williamson