2016 Pocket Selfies.

I began a collection of my 2016 in photos. And then I found these photos. They also tell a story.

It could be a selfie. Jung might call that my shadow archetype.


A spoon covered in peanut butter. In my bathroom. Parenting.


With all that pink and light, it looks like a happy place.


On my laptop goofing around with my phone. Normal.


Hot chocolate for a group. I don’t remember taking this pic.


Lots of travel this year as demonstrated by this lovely seat back pocket.


There is an analogy here about warning lights and stress.


If you ignore warning lights, you have engine failure. Apparently while driving.


And finally. Screenshot of an Oregon v. Oregon State flashback. No idea.



Make Shift Happen

When I first began a career in student affairs, my director was a good and fair person, always supporting a life in balance. Work late for a program? Take a few hours of personal time the next day. Spend a weekend away at a conference? Be sure to take a personal day to catch up on things at home. As a supervisor, I have attempted to mirror this courtesy, believing that people, and family and lives, are more important than a 60-hour workweek. There will always be work to done, reports to write, and programs to plan.
The theme of work-life balance remains a popular topic among colleagues as we seek an adequate distribution. Too many friends make 10-12 hour work days a habit while answering the duty phone each weekend. While we advise students to choose a few extracurricular activities on which to focus, we disregard this advice and drive ourselves to exhaustion.
Clare Cady fired off a discussion on the topic, inviting us to shift our thinking.

I am of the school that work-life balance does not exist. There is life. Part of life for many of us includes work, hopefully in a field where we are happy and satisfied. But life is not about work — it is about living.